SSS 4 and 6 Technical Terms and Creating a Film
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by Jennifer Hoban
| 17 Questions
Note from the author:
Worksheet for Script, Stage and Screen
1
4
According to the "Understanding Film Making - Production Process" article, which of the following are pitched as inspiration for a film?
https://www.scribd.com/document/45222559/Understanding-Film-Making-Production-Process
Remakes
Original Ideas
Snapple Bottle suggestions
Adaptations
Real life events
2
1
According to the "Understanding Film Making - Production Process" article, what is the role of the producer?
https://www.scribd.com/document/45222559/Understanding-Film-Making-Production-Process
The producer is the writer, idea man, financial source, costumer, designer, casting, acting and every single little part that goes into a film. No other personell is required.
The producer is the person who pitches the idea, then walks away with a big paycheck.
The producer decides to make a great idea into a reality. They are often the creative and commercial driving force behind the whole project.
The producer is a character required to appear in every movie, like Stan Lee appears in every Marvel's production.
3
1
According to the "Understanding Film Making - Production Process" article, what is the role of the director?
https://www.scribd.com/document/45222559/Understanding-Film-Making-Production-Process
The director is in charge of the production, he takes care of financial issues, marketing and even writing the script.
Stephen Spielberg is the only director, no one else exists, they are merely holograms.
A director sits in a silly chair and uses a megaphone, otherwise, he or she is useless. 0
A director speicalizes in visualizing a script and making it a reality: they know how to take a story and put it onto the screen
4
2
According to the "Understanding Film Making - Production Process" article, what goes into a pitch?
https://www.scribd.com/document/45222559/Understanding-Film-Making-Production-Process
5
1
According to the "Understanding Film Making - Production Process" article, what is a storyboard?
https://www.scribd.com/document/45222559/Understanding-Film-Making-Production-Process
A drawing each key scene in the way that it will eventually be filmed. It should give an impression of the eventual shot, including motion and camera moves. It helps plans out every shot in the film.
A children's book with pictures that illustrate what is happening to help small childern understand. It is usually made with thick cardboard to hold up against the wear and tear from infants and toddlers.
A series of picture of the actors' makeup, costumes and set pieces so that the producer and director can come to agreement about the "look" of the overall production.
A drawing of each key scene, but only the image to expect, no extra description of what the camera shot or angles should look like will be included, this is done on a separate document.
6
1
According to the "Understanding Film Making - Production Process" article, what is the role of the editor?
https://www.scribd.com/document/45222559/Understanding-Film-Making-Production-Process
Editors put together the film itself, they combine the "takes" from the day and splices them together (old negative films) or in digital editing, they trim the footage and create the scenes that will become a film.
Editors are in charge of the content of the film. They are required to edit the language and make sure nothing inappropriate gets into a movie rated G. It's like a censor specifically for a movie.
The editor is the person in charge of the entire production, they find the idea for the film, and oversee the creative process, but usually do not direct the production.
Editors work in the newspaper and book business. They check for grammar and spelling.
7
1
According to the "Understanding Film Making - Production Process" article, what is a "gaffer"?
https://www.scribd.com/document/45222559/Understanding-Film-Making-Production-Process
The person in charge of the gaff tape on the floor to help people stand on their mark for the
A trained electrician responsible for lighting the action and must also manage the huge potential risks of having highly-rated electricity cables, possibly in the rain
They are in charge of the production, he takes care of financial issues, marketing and even writing the script.
They put together the film itself, they combine the "takes" from the day and splices them together (old negative films) or in digital editing, they trim the footage and create the scenes that will become a film.
8
1
According to the "Understanding Film Making - Production Process" article, what is the responsibility of the Director of Photography? (or DoP)
https://www.scribd.com/document/45222559/Understanding-Film-Making-Production-Process
They are in charge of the pictures that are taken during the filming of a movie.
They are the director in charge of the Director, a middle-man between the producer and the director who communicates ideas about the way the film should be shot with the cameras.
The head of the Camera Department, and is ultimately responsible for how the film is shot. They use the shooting script and from the storyboards to decide on camera position, movement and lens for each shot.
The person in charge of splicing together the images from the footage taped each day and sending them to the producer.
9
1
Based on the information you learned from the article, "Understanding Film Making-Production Process," how many hours of prep, planning, filming and post production do you think will go into one mintue of a finished film?
100 hours
300 hours
800 hours
thousands of hours
10
1
Assuming that you watch a movie with a critical eye, should you be aware of all of the components that make a good movie the first time you watch it?
No, it should be complex enough that you never will see all of the different components, it will always evade you.
Yes,
No, it should be blended together well enough that you don't notice all of the working components of a good film the first time around, you shoudl be able to evaluate them the second and thrid time you watch the film.
Yes, any film that is good must clearly have every single element of a good movie, and must be very obvious about it so it can be caught the first viewing as well. Depth or quality of the element is never important.
11
1
Lenses are used to help create the image of the film. According to learnaboutfilm. com, what are the strengths of a wide angle lens?
http://learnaboutfilm.com/film-language/picture/usingthelens/
It's good for filming larger items, like buildings, cities and anything larger than a kitchen chair. If you zoom in using a wide angle lens, it also makes everything look wide as well. This is helfpul when you need to add a few pounds to an actor for a film.
It's good for filming indoors in cramped spaces, but you have to get much closer to the subject to make them look big. It’s easier to hold wide angle lenses steady, and if you do get close to the subject it makes the perspective look more dramatic.
It's good for close-ups, even though it seems to flatten perspective. It looks like you're looking through a telescope. It’s hard to handhold, and good for making subjects that are further away look bigger.
It's good for fliming things far away, but making them look up close, like if you want to use a candid shot of an actor in costume eating lunch, but they're across the film lot, it allows you to zoom in on them and get those sneaky, paparazzi shots.
12
1
Lenses are used to help create the image of the film. According to learnaboutfilm. com, what does a telephoto lens do for the film?
http://learnaboutfilm.com/film-language/picture/usingthelens/
It's good for filming larger items, like buildings, cities and anything larger than a kitchen chair. If you zoom in using a wide angle lens, it also makes everything look wide as well. This is helfpul when you need to add a few pounds to an actor for a film.
It's good for filming indoors in cramped spaces, but you have to get much closer to the subject to make them look big. It’s easier to hold wide angle lenses steady, and if you do get close to the subject it makes the perspective look more dramatic.
It's good for close-ups, even though it seems to flatten perspective. It looks like you're looking through a telescope. It’s hard to handhold, and good for making subjects that are further away look bigger.
It's good for fliming things far away, but making them look up close, like if you want to use a candid shot of an actor in costume eating lunch, but they're across the film lot, it allows you to zoom in on them and get those sneaky, paparazzi shots.
13
2
Lenses are used to help create the image of the film. According to learnaboutfilm. com, what is the difference between using a lens to create a "deep focus" vs. a "rack" or "pull focus"
http://learnaboutfilm.com/film-language/picture/usingthelens/
14
8
Using the glossary, identify which of the following are the 8 types of Shots defined?
http://www.springhurst.org/cinemagic/glossary_terms.htm
Medium close-up (MCU) is a close-up of one or two (sometimes three) characters, generally framing the shoulders or chest and the head. The term can also be used when the camera frames the character(s) from the waist up (or down), provided the character is right to the forefront and fills the frame, (otherwise this type of of shot is a medium shot).
Montage- is editing. More particularly: Eisenstein's idea that adjacent shots should relate to each other in such a way that A and B combine to produce another meaning, C, which is not actually recorded on the film.
Cut or transition is the splicing of 2 shots together. this cut is made by the film editor at the editing stage of a film. Between sequences the cut marks a rapid transition between one time and space and another, but depending on the nature of the cut it will have different meanings.
Close-up/extreme close-up (CU/ECU) is when the subject framed by the camera fills the screen. Connotation can be of intimacy, of having access to the mind or thought processes (including the subconscious) of the character. These shots can be used to stress the importance of a particular character at a particular moment in a film or place her or him as central to the narrative by singling out the character in CU at the beginning of the film.
Medium long shot (MLS) is halfway between a long and a medium shot. If this shot frames a character then the whole body will be in view towards the middle ground of the shot. A quite open shot in terms of readability, showing considerably more of the surroundings in relation to the character(s).
Tracking shot/travelling shot/dollying shot means the camera is being moved by wheels, either on a dolly (a low tracking shot, or in a car, or even a train.
The movement is normally quite fluid (except perhaps in some of the wider car chases) and the tracking can be either fast or slow.
Medium shot (MS) frames a character from the waist, hips or knees up (or down). The camera is sufficiently distanced from the body for the character to be seen in relation to her or his surroundings (in an apartment, for example).
Long shot (LS) is when the subject or characters are at some distance from the camera; they are seen in full within their surrounding environment.
Extreme long shot (ELS) is when the subject or characters are very much to the background of the shot. Surroundings now have as much if not more importance, especially if the shot is in high-angle. A first way to consider these shots is to say that a shot lends itself to a greater or lesser readability dependent on its type or length. As the camera moves further away from the main subject (whether person or object) the visual field lends itself to an increasingly more complex reading.
Point of view shot (Often abbreviated as 'pov') is a shot which shows the scene from the specfic point of view of one of the characters.

15
1
Using the glossary, identify which of the following is NOT a type of "cut" or "transition"?
http://www.springhurst.org/cinemagic/glossary_terms.htm
An Aerial Shot is taken from a crane, plane, or helicopter. Not necessarily a moving shot.
Cross-cutting is literally, cutting between different sets of action that can be occuring simultaneously or at different times, (this term is used synonomously but somewhat incorrectly with parallel editing.) Cross-cutting is used to build suspense, or to show the relationship between the different sets of action.
Match cut is the exact opposite of a jump cut within a scene. These cuts make sure that there is a spatial-visual logic between the differently positioned shots within a scene. thus, where the camera moves to, and the angle of the camera, makes visual sense to the spectator. Eyeline matching is part of the same visual logic: the first shot shows a character looking at something off-screen, the second shot shows what is being looked at. Match cuts then are also part of the seamlessness, the reality effect, so much favoured by Hollywood.
Jump cut is where there is no match between the 2 spliced shots. Within a sequence, or more particularly a scene, jump cuts give the effect of bad editing. The opposite of a match cut, the jump cut is an abrupt cut between 2 shots that calls attention to itself because it does not match the shots seamlessly. It marks a transition in time and space but is called a jump cut because it jars the sensibilities; it makes the spectator jump and wonder where the narrative has got to. Jean-Luc Godard is undoubtedly one of the best exponents of this use of the jump cut.
16
2
Using the glossary, define Point of View, and explain how you understand viewers are shown the point of view in a film.
http://www.springhurst.org/cinemagic/glossary_terms.htm
17
2
Based on your answer for #16, explain the differences between how the main point of view is shown in a play vs. a film?
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