English Parliament Laws and their impact on the American political though process
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by Adam Parry
| 20 Questions
Note from the author:
Focuses on the impact of English laws on the American colonists - needs ppt
Period 2
1. No taxes without concent
2. Pay taxes don't lose money/property
3. Right to a trial
4. Free Elections
5. Executive cant act without the legislatures approval
6. Can't be punished without a trail
7. Life, liberty and property
8.
Period 3
1 Executive can't act without Congress
2 Can't take property if pay taxes
3 Right to Self Government
4 Can't raise taxes without consent
5 Gov't must protect people or be replaced
6 Need witness to be accused at a trial
7 Right to a trial
8 Free Elections
9. All of the other ones
Period 4
  1. Pay taxes, keep money
  2. Self government
  3. Legislature controls king
4. Free Elections
5 Question Witnesses
6. No punishment without trial
7. People have a right to a trial
8. Allowed to call a witness
9. All of them

Period 5
1 Protect people
2. Life, liberty, property
3. Free elections
4. Executive can't act alone
5. Rt to question witnesses
6. Self Government
7. Rt to a trial
8. Can't raise taxes without people's agreement
Period 6
1. Life, Liberty, Property
2. Self government
3. Free elections
4. Rt to change government
5. Exectutive can't act without legislature
6. No taxes can go up without our agreement
7. Rt to a trial
8. Must be informed of your crime
1
0
Response 1. Answer in 2-3 sentences.
Background info from your King

What is Social Contract Theory by Thomas Hobbes and John Locke
  • •The role of the government is to protect the people and provide them with order, security, services and economic advantages. People will offer their support and loyalty to the government in return for these services. However, if either party fails in the execution of their part of the contract they can be punished (if citizens) or replaced (if a government official).
2
10
Response 2
3
1
Class Legislative Body - Record the names of our elected leaders (Response 3)
Self Government for the Colonies
•If the class gave itself the power to have a legislative branch then you may:

Elect one person to have the power to petition the king directly.

You will also be allowed as a class to use a state legislative branch to help address policies related to these 5 national government legislative acts. You can elect 6 people total to vote for our class and represent our interests.
•Each elected official to be paid an extra $3 hour for the duration of this government
4
5
Response 4: First Act1.
1. What is this 1st act?
2. What must citizens sacrifice to help support the government? 3. Does this government action abuse your rights (as you listed them as a class. See above for your class)? Explain in 1-2 sentences.
5
0
1st Act: Actions that we can take. Which one do you favor as a citizen to attempt to influence the government?
Ask our national representative to make an argument to the national government to end the fee
Ask our national representative to make an argument to ask the government to lessen the fee
I will support this government action
Rebel against the government
6
5
Response 4: Analysis - Answer in 1-2 sentences.
1. Are you satisfied with our class's actions to protect our rights? Explain. 2. What could we be doing differently or better to help ensure our rights are protected?
7
5
Response 5: 2nd Act
1. What is this 2nd act
2. what must citizens sacrifice to help support the government? 3. Does this government action abuse your rights (as you listed them as a class. See above for your class)? Explain in 1-2 sentences.
8
0
2nd Act: Actions that we can take. Which one do you favor as a citizen to attempt to influence the government?
Ask our national representative to make an argument to the national government to end the fee
Ask our national representative to make an argument to ask the government to lessen the fee
I will support this government action
Rebel against the government
9
5
Response 6 Analysis: After dealing with the second National Act (Law)Answer in 1-2 sentences.
1. Are you satisfied with our class's actions to protect our rights? Explain. 2. Are we maintaining our role / responsibility in the Social Contract between us and our Monarch?
10
5
Response 7: 3rd Act1.
1. What is this 3rd act?
2. What must citizens sacrifice to help support the government? 3. Does this government action abuse your rights (as you listed them as a class. See above for your class)? Explain in 1-2 sentences.
11
0
3rd Act: Actions that we can take. Which one do you favor as a citizen to attempt to influence the government?
Ask our national representative to make an argument to the national government to end the fee
Ask our national representative to make an argument to ask the government to lessen the fee
I will support this government action
Rebel against the government
12
5
Response 8 Analysis: After dealing with the third National Act (Law)Answer in 1-2 sentences.
1. Are we being too demanding or not demanding enough as a class for what we expect the government to give us verses what we are willing to pay to support the government? 2. Are we maintaining our role / responsibility in the Social Contract between us and our Monarch?
13
5
Response 9: 4th Act
1. What is this 4th act?
2. What sacrifices have to be made by the people?
3. Does this violate your rights? Explain in 1-2 sentences. 4. Under the present power structure (see image below) that our government is based off of, do the colonies (our class) have the right to resist these 4 acts of their national government (the monarch)? Explain in a sentence.
4th Act Power situation
14
0
4th Act: Actions that we can take. Which one do you favor as a citizen to attempt to influence the government?
Ask our national representative to make an argument to the national government to end the fee
Ask our national representative to make an argument to ask the government to lessen the fee
Make our own state law to find a way to problem solve around this
I support the monarch and the government
Rebel against the government
15
5
Response 10 Analysis: After dealing with the third National Act (Law)Answer in 1-2 sentences.
1. To maintain order, if people were to resist national laws, is the national gov’t justified in stopping them to protect the country? 2. Does the present political situation we have helped to create violate our rights under Social Contract Theory, or our we failing in our responsibilities to the government under Social Contract Theory? Explain.
16
5
Response 11: 5th Act (final act)
1. What is this 5th act?
2. What must citizens sacrifice to help support the government? 3. Does this government action abuse your rights (as you listed them as a class. See above for your class)? Explain in 1-2 sentences.
17
0
5th Act: Actions that we can take. Which one do you favor as a citizen to attempt to influence the government?
Ask our national representative to make an argument to the national government to end the fee
Ask our national representative to make an argument to ask the government to lessen the fee
Make our own state law to find a way to problem solve around this
Rebel against the government
Support the King
18
10
Response 12 Analysis: This is where you must reflect upon the experience we have just concluded over the past few days.
1. Whom should be blamed for the upheaval in the nation? The monarch, the parliament (congress in the UK) or the people? Explain. 2. Do the British subjects living in American have a right to overthrow Social Contract with their government in England and its established leaders? Explain.
19
10
Look at the Powerpoint slide presented.
Which option would you vote for in order to find a final solution to this problem from the list provided on the ppt? Justify your decision in 2-3 sentences. Make a convincing argument.
20
20
After deciding on Number 19 you need to review the Social Contract from the views of the political philosophers.

You will be given time to develop an argument with a group for the upcoming debate.
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