Unit 3 Common Formative Assessment
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by Laura Trammell
| 12 Questions
Note from the author:
Unit 6CFA
Directions: Please use this passage below to answer questions 1-6
fromThank You, Ma’am” by Langston Hughes
It was about eleven o'clock at night, and she was walking alone, when a boy ran up behind her and tried to snatch her purse. The strap broke with the single tug the boy gave it from behind. But the boy's weight and the weight of the purse combined caused him to lose his balance so, instead of taking off full blast as he had hoped, the boy fell on his back on the sidewalk, and his legs flew up. The large woman simply turned around and kicked him right square in his blue-jeaned sitter. Then she reached down, picked the boy up by his shirt front, and shook him until his teeth rattled.
She held him. Then she said, "Now ain't you ashamed of yourself?" . . . "You ought to be my son. I would teach you right from wrong. Least I can do right now is to wash your face." . . . "When I get through with you, sir, you're going to remember Mrs. Luella Bates Washington Jones." Mrs. Jones. . . jerked him around in front of her. . .and continued to drag him up the street. When she got to her door, she dragged the boy inside, down a hall, and into a large furnished room at the rear of the house. . . She said, "What's your name?"
"Roger," answered the boy.
"Then, Roger, you go to that sink and wash your face," said the woman, whereupon she turned him loose-at last. Roger looked at the door-looked at the woman-looked at the door-and went to the sink. "You might run that comb through your hair so you will look presentable.". . He did not trust the woman not to trust him. And he did not want to be mistrusted now. . .When they were finished eating she got up and said, "Now, take this ten dollars and buy yourself some blue suede shoes. And next time, do not make the mistake of latching onto my pocketbook nor nobody else's.
She led him down the hall to the front door and opened it. "Goodnight! Behave yourself, boy!" she said, looking out into the street.The boy wanted to say something other than "Thank You, Ma'am," . ..but he couldn't as he turned at the barren stoop and looked back at the woman alone in the door. He barely managed to say "Thank you" before she shut the door.
fromThank You, Ma’am” by Langston Hughes
It was about eleven o'clock at night, and she was walking alone, when a boy ran up behind her and tried to snatch her purse. The strap broke with the single tug the boy gave it from behind. But the boy's weight and the weight of the purse combined caused him to lose his balance so, instead of taking off full blast as he had hoped, the boy fell on his back on the sidewalk, and his legs flew up. The large woman simply turned around and kicked him right square in his blue-jeaned sitter. Then she reached down, picked the boy up by his shirt front, and shook him until his teeth rattled.
She held him. Then she said, "Now ain't you ashamed of yourself?" . . . "You ought to be my son. I would teach you right from wrong. Least I can do right now is to wash your face." . . . "When I get through with you, sir, you're going to remember Mrs. Luella Bates Washington Jones." Mrs. Jones. . . jerked him around in front of her. . .and continued to drag him up the street. When she got to her door, she dragged the boy inside, down a hall, and into a large furnished room at the rear of the house. . . She said, "What's your name?"
"Roger," answered the boy.
"Then, Roger, you go to that sink and wash your face," said the woman, whereupon she turned him loose-at last. Roger looked at the door-looked at the woman-looked at the door-and went to the sink. "You might run that comb through your hair so you will look presentable.". . He did not trust the woman not to trust him. And he did not want to be mistrusted now. . .When they were finished eating she got up and said, "Now, take this ten dollars and buy yourself some blue suede shoes. And next time, do not make the mistake of latching onto my pocketbook nor nobody else's.
She led him down the hall to the front door and opened it. "Goodnight! Behave yourself, boy!" she said, looking out into the street.The boy wanted to say something other than "Thank You, Ma'am," . ..but he couldn't as he turned at the barren stoop and looked back at the woman alone in the door. He barely managed to say "Thank you" before she shut the door.
1
6 pts
(ELACC6RL3: Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves towards a resolution.) Because of his experience with Mrs. Jones, Roger is which type of character?
A Static
B Evolving
C Dynamic
D Protagonist
2
6 pts
(ELACC6RL4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.) The following words from the passage create what type of mood? “It was about eleven o'clock at night, and she was walking alone, when a boy ran up behind her and tried to snatch her purse. The strap broke with the single tug the boy gave it from behind.”
A happy
B tense
C sad
D calm
3
6 pts
(ELACC6RL3: Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves towards a resolution). What is the major conflict of this passage?
A Roger feels an internal conflict about trying to steal Mrs. Jones’ purse.
B Roger feels an external conflict about his physical struggle with Mrs. Jones.
C Roger experiences no conflict about what is happening in the apartment. .
D Roger experiences an internal conflict because he wants to live with Mrs. Jones.
4
6 pts
(ELACC6RL1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.) Based upon Mrs. Jones's actions and words and the author's description of her life, what inference may the reader make about the woman?
A Mrs. Jones wants grandchildren.
B Mrs. Jones is a wealthy lady.
C Mrs. Jones is a friendly lady.
D Mrs. Jones values honesty.
5
6 pts
(ELACC6RL2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details.) Which of the following plot elements of a short story is demonstrated in the following passage? “The boy wanted to say something other than "Thank You, Ma'am," . . .but he couldn't as he turned at the barren stoop and looked back at the woman alone in the door. He barely managed to say "Thank you" before she shut the door.”
A theme
B climax
C resolution
D falling action
6
6 pts
(ELACC6L1: a. Ensure that pronouns are in the proper case (subjective,objective, possessive).) Identify the reflexive pronoun in the following sentences from the passage. "Now ain't you ashamed of yourself?"....... "You ought to be my son. I would teach you right from wrong.”
A You
B I
C My
D Yourself
Directions: Please use the passages below to answer questions 7-12.
Passage A

WHAT IS HOLOCAUST DENIAL AND DISTORTION?
Holocaust denial is an attempt to oppose or negate the established facts of the Nazi genocide (genocide is the intentional action to destroy a people) of European Jewry. Key denial assertions are: that the murder of approximately six million Jews during World War II never occurred; that the Nazis had no official policy or intention to exterminate the Jews; and that the poison gas chambers in Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp never existed.
A newer trend is the distortion (twisting or changing) of the facts of the Holocaust. Common distortions include, for example, statements that: the figure of six million Jewish deaths is an exaggeration; the deaths in the concentration camps were the results of disease or starvation but not planned by the Nazis; and that the diary of Anne Frank is a forgery.
Holocaust denial and distortion undermine the understanding of history. Denial and distortion of the Holocaust almost always reflect antisemitism.
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT FOR ME TO CARE ABOUT HOLOCAUST DENIAL AND DISTORTION?
The denial or distortion of history is an assault on truth and understanding. Comprehension and memory of the past are crucial to how we understand ourselves, our society, and our goals for the future. Intentionally denying or distorting the historical record threatens communal understanding of how to safeguard democracy and individual rights.
The Nazi persecution of the Jews began with hateful words, escalated to discrimination and dehumanization, and culminated in genocide. The consequences for Jews were horrific, but suffering and death was not limited to them. Millions of others were victimized, displaced, forced into slave labor, and murdered. The Holocaust shows that when one group is targeted, all people are vulnerable. Today, in a world witnessing rising anti-semitism or hostility to or prejudice against Jews, awareness of this fact is critical. A society that tolerates antisemitism is susceptible to other forms of racism, hatred, and oppression.


Passage B
“Holocaust Denialfrom Kids.Net.Au
Holocaust denial is the belief that the Nazi German government and its associates did not commit genocide against millions of Jews, gays, Poles, and gypsies and the physically or mentally ill, as well as other groups during World War II. In denying the existence of the Holocaust entirely, it is generally regarded as the most extreme form of Holocaust revisionism.
Evidence of the existence of the Holocaust was documented by Allied forces who entered Germany and its associated Axis states towards the end of World War II. Among the evidence produced was film and stills of the existence of concentration camps, as well as the testimony of those freed when the camps were entered. As a result of the records produced, historians generally agree that Holocaust denial is contrary to the known facts of history.
The suggestion that the Holocaust did not exist is based on a number of premises:
  1. The film footage shown after the War was all specially manufactured as propaganda against the Nazis by the Allied forces;
  2. That the claims of what the Nazis supposedly did to the Jews were all intended to facilitate the Allies in their intention to enable the creation of a Jewish homeland in Palestine;
  3. That where crimes were committed, they were not centrally orchestrated and thus the Nazi leadership bore no responsibility for the implementation of such a policy.
Few historians accept these theses, stating that the evidence to the contrary is overwhelming. Due to the extremely rapid collapse of the Nazi forces at the end of the war, attempts to destroy evidence in Germany were for the most part unsuccessful. After their defeat, many tons of documents were recovered, and many thousands of bodies were found not yet completely decomposed, in mass graves near many concentation camps. The physical evidence and the documentary proof included records of train shipments of Jews to the camps, orders for tons of cyanide and other poisons, and the remaining concentration camp structures. Interviews with survivors completed the picture. As a result, these extreme revisionist views are almost universally rejected by all historians.
The overwhelming number of academics and historians dismiss claims that the Holocaust was a fiction and argue that the evidence concerning the events was too widespread and well-documented to have been forged.
7
6 pts
(ELACC6RI1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text). Which of the following citations from Passage A best defines Holocaust denial?
A “The denial or distortion of history is an assault on truth and understanding.”
B “an attempt to oppose or negate the established facts of the Nazi genocide of European Jewry.”
C “poison gas chambers at concentration camps”
D “A society that tolerates antisemitism is susceptible to other forms of racism, hatred, and oppression.”
8
6 pts
(ELACC6RI4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.) Based on context clues in Passage A how can anti-semitism best be defined?
A Religious beliefs
B Hostility to or prejudice against African-Americans
C Standing up against Nazis
D Hostility to or prejudice against Jews
9
6 pts
(ELACC6RI1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.) Based on Passage B what citation best supports the inference for existence of the Holocaust?
A “Among the evidence produced was film and stills of the existence of concentration camps, as well as the testimony of those freed when the camps were entered.”
B The film footage shown after the War was all specially manufactured as propaganda against the Nazis by the Allied forces.”
C “As a result, these extreme revisionist views are almost universally rejected by all historians.”
D “Few historians accept these theses, stating that the evidence to the contrary is overwhelming.”
10
6 pts
(ELACC6RI2: Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details.) Which of the following sentences best summarizes the main idea of Passage B?
A The film footage shown after the War was all specially manufactured as propaganda against the Nazis by the Allied forces.
B These extreme revisionist views are almost universally rejected by all historians.
C There is overwhelming evidence to support the existence of the Holocaust despite the Holocaust denial revisionism.
D Attempts to destroy evidence in Germany were for the most part unsuccessful.
11
15 pts
(ELACC6W5: With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.) Part A: Using the articles above, make a list of at least four facts about Holocaust denial and distortion.
12
25 pts
(ELACC6W2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.)
Background: Imagine that some people said that slave trade never occurred. How would that lead to racism and prejudice against African-Americans? Now apply those thoughts to this topic:

Part B: Explain how Holocaust denial and distortion might make individuals think that antisemitism (hostility to or prejudice against Jews) is acceptable. Be sure to cite evidence from both articles.
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