Plessy vs. Ferguson
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by Jaclyn Roman
| 11 Questions
1
1
Select a detail from the text that supports the idea that "seperate, but equal" was ineffective.
The state of Louisiana said that mandated segregation did not suggest that blacks were inferior to whites, because the whites-only train cars and the blacks-only train cars were of the same quality.
Laws that explicitly segregated the races could not be challenged in court anymore; the Supreme Court had given segregation the legal “okay,” and states took advantage of this to establish segregation for decades to come.
Although segregation occurred in northern states, especially in public school systems, it was most prevalent in the South. Laws that segregated blacks and whites came to be known as a Jim Crow laws.
Public schools for black children received less funding, less maintenance, and less teacher training. Things like colored bathrooms were poorly constructed and rarely cleaned.
2
1
Select two sentences from “Plessy vs, Ferguson” that supports the inference that the Supreme Court used the word “equal” to defend the separate spaces and services for blacks and whites. (RI.1.1)
“Segregation was common across the country by the 1890s, not just in the South.” (Paragraph 4)
“... mandated segregation did not suggest that blacks were inferior to whites, because the whites-only train cars and black-only train cars were of the same quality. (Paragraph 5)
“Laws that segregated blacks and white came to be known as a Jim Crow law.” (Paragraph 7)
“Public schools for black children received less funding, less maintenance, and less teacher training.” (Paragraph 8)
“The country may have been ‘equal’ by the standards of Plessy v. Ferguson, but in reality, it was not at all.” (Paragraph 10)
3
1
What were "Jim Crow" laws?

4
1
Part A: Which statements express the two central ideas of the text? Choose two.
Plessy v. Ferguson was the first time that an African American challenged segregation and brought attention to the issue.
The decision of Plessy v. Ferguson made racial segregation more widely practiced and accepted in the United States.
While racial segregation continued after the decision of Plessy v. Ferguson, it was not upheld by the law.
The decision of Plessy v. Ferguson proved that both white and black citizens were largely against racial segregation.
The decision of Plessy v. Ferguson ensured that African Americans would face legal segregation for years.
5
1
Part B: Which detail from the text best supports the answer to Question 2 Part A?
“By 1896 the Civil War was over, and the amendments prohibiting slavery and ensuring equal rights for all citizens had been part of the U.S. Constitution for more than 25 years.” (Paragraph 1)
“His lawyers argued that the law mandating railcar segregation was unconstitutional because of the 14th Amendment, which ensured equal protection under the law for all citizens.” (Paragraph 3)
“He believed it was wrong to undermine the 14th Amendment in this way, when the majority of the country had favored the new law.” (Paragraph 6)
“Laws that explicitly segregated the races could not be challenged in court anymore; the Supreme Court had given segregation the legal ‘okay,’ and states took advantage of this to establish segregation for decades to come.” (Paragraph 7)
6
1
Which of the following describes the relationship between Jim Crow and Plessy v. Ferguson? (RI.1.3)
Jim Crow segregation laws compelled Plessy to protest segregated trains.
Jim Crow segregation laws were made possible by the Plessy v. Ferguson decision.
Plessy v. Ferguson hoped to end the segregation common during Jim Crow.
Plessy v. Ferguson made Jim Crow laws widely accepted, but not officially legal.
7
1
How does the author’s discussion of Jim Crow help readers understand the consequences of racial segregation laws? (RI.1.3)
It emphasizes how African Americans had access to lower quality services and spaces, and more difficulty participating in voting.
It stresses that African Americans had to travel north if they wanted to avoid the discrimination present in the South.
It shows how many spaces were reserved for whites, while people of color were not allowed their own spaces.
It highlights how dangerous it was for African Americans to challenge Jim Crow laws in the South.
8
1
Which statement best illustrates an objective summary of the text? (RI.1.2)
After the Civil War ended there was still racial tensions across the country. To protest the law requiring racial segregation on train cars Plessy, who was one-eighth black, purchased a ticket for the white-only car. The train company arrested him moments after he stepped into the car. Plessy suid Louisiana arguing the 14th amendment made segregation unconstitutional. After the courts sided against Plessy he and his lawyer appealed until the case went to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court also ruled against Plessy stating the train cars were “separate, but equal” and therefore it was constitutional. The Plessy vs. Ferguson decision gave states permission to create segregation laws for years to come. The Supreme Court should never have ruled against the 14th amendment.
After the Civil War ended there was still racial tensions across the country. To protest the law requiring racial segregation on train cars Plessy, who was one-eighth black, purchased a ticket for the white-only car. Even with the segregation law, Plessy should have been able to sit in the white-only car, because of his one-eight heritage. However, the train company arrested him moments after he stepped into the car. Plessy suid Louisiana arguing the 14th amendment made segregation unconstitutional. After the courts sided against Plessy he and his lawyer appealed until the case went to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court also ruled against Plessy stating the train cars were “separate, but equal” and therefore it was constitutional.
After the Civil War ended there was still racial tensions across the country. To protest the law requiring racial segregation on train cars Plessy, who was one-eighth black, purchased a ticket for the white-only car. The train company arrested him moments after he stepped into the car. Plessy suid Louisiana arguing the 14th amendment made segregation unconstitutional. After the courts sided against Plessy he and his lawyer appealed until the case went to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court also ruled against Plessy stating the train cars were “separate, but equal” and therefore it was constitutional. The Plessy vs. Ferguson decision gave states permission to create segregation laws for years to come.
“Separate, but equal” means that the places and services blacks used were considered by the Supreme Court to be of the same quality as those used by whites, however this was not true in practice. The concept of “separate, but equal” in the Plessy vs. Ferguson case was used to condone racial segregation. For example, “The state of Louisiana said that mandated segregation did not suggest that blacks were inferior to whites, because the whites-only train cars and the blacks-only train cars were of the same quality.”
9
1
What does the word "dissenting" mean as it's used below?

Justice John Marshall Harlan wrote an explanation of his dissenting vote, explaining how white Americans saw themselves in a position of power, even if they were technically “equal” with others. (Paragraph 6)
incorrect
disagreeing
unpopular
furious
10
1
What is the author's purpose in writing this passage?
To explain where Jim Crow laws came from, and why they are still prevelant today.
To explain why Plessy protested a law he felt was unfair.
To explain the history of Plessy vs. Ferguson.
To explain the history of segregation in the U.S.
11
5
The text states " States passed laws requiring literacy or history tests, background checks, proof of land ownership, or other complex processes just to register to vote."

Why would enacting these laws make things more difficult for African Americans?

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