Text Structure - I can identify and explain the text structure of a non-fictional text.
starstarstarstarstarstarstarstarstarstar
by Joshua Moore
| 6 Questions
1
1
What is the text structure for the article below?

Get into the Loop!
zoom_in
Did you ever wonder what happens to the aluminum cans you recycle? Weekly Readerwatched a recycling center in action at the Garbage Museum in Stratford, Connecticut.

1. Sort and Separate

Trucks drop off aluminum cans that are mixed with massive loads of plastic bottles and glass. The trash travels along conveyor belts to be sorted and separated.

2. Compress the Mess.

Machines compress aluminum cans into giant bales.

3. Close the Loop.

The bales are sold to companies that turn the recycled cans into something usable. From recycled aluminum cans, more cans are made. When you buy recycled products, you "close the loop."

Do Your Bit—Reuse and Recycle!

Each American throws away about 5 pounds of garbage each day. Earth Day, April 22, reminds people how important it is to reduce waste. Here are some ways:
  • Carry a lunch box instead of a paper lunch bag, and pack food in reusable containers.
  • Use both sides of a sheet of paper.
  • Donate old clothing and toys to a charity.
  • Make a compost pile using food scraps, leaves, and grass clippings. Composting is nature's way of recycling. Plants and other wastes decompose, or rot, and nourish the soil.
  • Recycle plastic and glass bottles and jars, newspapers, and aluminum cans. Recycling just one aluminum can will save enough energy to run your TV for three hours!

Main Idea
Compare / Contrast
Cause / Effect
Sequence
2
3
Using text evidence, describe how you determined the text structure.

Get into the Loop!

zoom_in
Did you ever wonder what happens to the aluminum cans you recycle? Weekly Readerwatched a recycling center in action at the Garbage Museum in Stratford, Connecticut.

1. Sort and Separate

Trucks drop off aluminum cans that are mixed with massive loads of plastic bottles and glass. The trash travels along conveyor belts to be sorted and separated.

2. Compress the Mess.

Machines compress aluminum cans into giant bales.

3. Close the Loop.

The bales are sold to companies that turn the recycled cans into something usable. From recycled aluminum cans, more cans are made. When you buy recycled products, you "close the loop."

Do Your Bit—Reuse and Recycle!

Each American throws away about 5 pounds of garbage each day. Earth Day, April 22, reminds people how important it is to reduce waste. Here are some ways:
  • Carry a lunch box instead of a paper lunch bag, and pack food in reusable containers.
  • Use both sides of a sheet of paper.
  • Donate old clothing and toys to a charity.
  • Make a compost pile using food scraps, leaves, and grass clippings. Composting is nature's way of recycling. Plants and other wastes decompose, or rot, and nourish the soil.
  • Recycle plastic and glass bottles and jars, newspapers, and aluminum cans. Recycling just one aluminum can will save enough energy to run your TV for three hours!


3
1
What is the text structure for the article below?

That Tickles!

Have you ever tried tickling yourself? If you're like most people, it doesn't work. Scientists say there's a good reason why. They recently conducted tickling experiments and discovered that it has to do with your brain.
The cerebellum is an area of your brain that controls your body's balance and coordination. When you tickle yourself, the cerebellum tells other parts of your brain to ignore the feeling.
Scientists now think that your brain is protecting your body by not responding to tickles you give yourself. A self-tickle is silly business. A tickle coming from somewhere else might be serious. It could be a spider crawling on your skin or another real danger. In cases like that, the cerebellum warns your body that it needs to pay attention. That's no laughing matter!

Main Idea
Compare / Contrast
Cause / Effect
Sequence
4
3
Using text evidence, describe how you determined the text structure.

That TIckles!

Have you ever tried tickling yourself? If you're like most people, it doesn't work. Scientists say there's a good reason why. They recently conducted tickling experiments and discovered that it has to do with your brain.
The cerebellum is an area of your brain that controls your body's balance and coordination. When you tickle yourself, the cerebellum tells other parts of your brain to ignore the feeling.
Scientists now think that your brain is protecting your body by not responding to tickles you give yourself. A self-tickle is silly business. A tickle coming from somewhere else might be serious. It could be a spider crawling on your skin or another real danger. In cases like that, the cerebellum warns your body that it needs to pay attention. That's no laughing matter!


5
1
What is the text structure for the article below?

Winning the Vote!

Imagine if boys made all the rules. That's how it was in 1776, when the United States was founded. Women were not allowed to vote until 1920! This year [2012] is the 92nd anniversary of that important event.
zoom_in
The women's suffrage movement began in the 1800s. Suffrage is the right to vote. To win this right, women held protests and marches. Hundreds of those women were arrested and jailed.
Women's groups across the country are honoring those who fought for this right with special events throughout the year. "Learning how women's actions changed America is important. It encourages us to understand that we can make a better world," said Molly Murphy MacGregor, the president of the National Women's History Project.!

Main Idea
Compare / Contrast
Cause / Effect
Sequence
6
3
Using text evidence, describe how you determined the text structure

Winning the Vote!

Imagine if boys made all the rules. That's how it was in 1776, when the United States was founded. Women were not allowed to vote until 1920! This year [2012] is the 92nd anniversary of that important event.
zoom_in
The women's suffrage movement began in the 1800s. Suffrage is the right to vote. To win this right, women held protests and marches. Hundreds of those women were arrested and jailed.
Women's groups across the country are honoring those who fought for this right with special events throughout the year. "Learning how women's actions changed America is important. It encourages us to understand that we can make a better world," said Molly Murphy MacGregor, the president of the National Women's History Project.!


Add to my formatives list

Formative uses cookies to allow us to better understand how the site is used. By continuing to use this site, you consent to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.