Semester 2- Formative 2
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by Kristen Mosal
| 8 Questions
Note from the author:
Oakdale

Opinion: Millions of children still in slavery, and it must be stopped

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Caption: Azir Mulla, 14, sews inside a tailor's shop in Gauhati, India, Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014.

NEW DELHI, India – The world should be ashamed that we have not ended child slavery. Not only does child slavery still exist, but the number of child slaves has remained the same in the last two decades. More than 5.5 million children are slaves. They are bought and sold like animals, sometimes for less than a pack of cigarettes. In addition, there are 68 million child workers and 59 million children who do not go to school. Each year, 15 million girls younger than 15 are forced to get married. The situation is completely wrong.
Clearly, there is much work left to do. About 550,000 people have signed a petition to push the United Nations to strongly oppose child slavery in its goals for the next 15 years. These goals are the called Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). Among them are plans to wipe out forced labor, end slavery and stop the worst forms of child labor.
Now it is time to take action. It is not only governments that are responsible for ending slavery. Businesses, organizations and individual citizens must all help. They must pressure their leaders to make a change.


Changes In India's Law Could Be Dangerous

Consider the situation in India. The government is considering making changes to two major laws. These are the National Education Policy and the Child Labour Act.
The changes to the Child Labour Act would allow children under the age of 14 to work in "non-hazardous" family businesses or the entertainment industry. This may sound innocent, but it fails to acknowledge what is really going on. Working for family businesses can be as brutal as any other kind. And the list of "hazardous" jobs is far from complete.
My organization, Bachpan Bachao Andolan, is the largest group in India to protect children. An 8-year-old girl named Arpita was forced to work 16- to 18-hour days in the home of her uncle as a servant. When we rescued her, we had to break down the door. It was the middle of winter, and she was barely clothed and badly fed. Arpita was covered in wounds, and was hiding under a rag on her uncle's balcony.


Many Rescued From Family Businesses

Likewise, when we rescued 10-year-old Mohsin and 8-year-old Aslam in 2007, they were starving. The two children worked for their uncle under terrible conditions. They made children's clothing for one of world's largest garment sellers. The jobs performed by Arpita, Mohsin and Aslam would not be considered dangerous under changes to the Child Labour Act.
Recently, we found that one-fifth of the children younger than age 14 that we rescued were working for family businesses. More than two-fifths of them were doing dangerous jobs that would be allowed under the law. For example, the children worked in roadside restaurants. They also made clothes, leather goods, makeup or electronics.
There are millions of enslaved children like Arpita, Mohsin and Aslam. But if the proposed changes are made, we will not be able to rescue a single child under 14 years old working for his or her family. It does not matter how terrible their work conditions are. The effect would be devastating, not only on individual children, but also on the future of our society. On behalf of India's children, we call upon our Parliament to do the right thing and reject the proposed changes to the Child Labour Act.


Children Must Be Protected Worldwide

Beyond India, it is just as urgent to protect children. We must do everything in our power to protect the fundamental human rights of every person. It is especially important to protect the most defenseless. Governments worldwide must commit to protecting and educating their young people.
My coworkers and I have humbly done our part over the years. We have rescued more than 84,000 children from terrible conditions.
Still, far too many children remain enslaved. They are missing out not just on their childhood, but also on the chance for a happy, healthy and prosperous future. It is time for the world to stand up and speak for those who cannot speak for themselves. We must demand that our leaders fulfill their promise of ensuring that every child's life is enriched by education and full of promise. Our generation can and should be the one that ends child slavery forever.
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Which detail would be important to include in a summary of the article? 6.2
Each year, 15 million girls younger than 15 are forced to get married.
When we rescued her, we had to break down the door.
For example, the children worked in roadside restaurants.
But if the proposed changes are made, we will not be able to rescue a single child younger than 14 years old working for his or her family.
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Which claim made by the author lacks evidence in the passage to support it? 6.8
Child slavery should have never existed.
Children should not be allowed to work for family members.
The proposed changes to the Child Labour Act should be stopped.
People have the resources to help protect children from slavery and working dangerous jobs.
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Which sentence from the section "Many Rescued From Family Businesses" uses statistics to support the author's claims? 6.8
Recently, we found that one-fifth of the children younger than age 14 that we rescued were working for family businesses.
For example, the children worked in roadside restaurants.
There are millions of enslaved children like Arpita, Mohsin and Aslam.
The effect would be devastating, not only on individual children, but also on the future of our society.
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Based on the image and the article, what conclusion can be made? 6.7
If Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) are met, it will eliminate the amount of children that are forced to work in tailor shops.
The author and his coworkers are protecting and educating young children about how jobs like making clothing are dangerous.
The Child Labour Act is a necessary resource for people to support so that children under the age of 14 will not be forced to work in “hazardous” jobs.
Even though jobs like making clothing is considered a “non-hazardous” job, the conditions that children are forced to work in are unfair and could be dangerous.

The Clock Man

By: Shel Silverstein


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“How much will you pay for an extra day?”
The clock man asked the child.
“Not one penny,” the answer came,
“For my days are as many as smiles.”

[5] “How much will you pay for an extra day?”
He asked when the child was grown.
“Maybe a dollar or maybe less,
For I’ve plenty of days of my own.”

“How much will you pay for an extra day?”
[10] He asked when the time came to die.
“All of the pearls in all of the seas,
And all of the stars in the sky.
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PART A: Which of the following best describes the theme of the poem? 6.2
People are afraid of death their entire lives.There’s nothing more important to people than staying young.
People care about time more as they get older.
Children often feel like they will never get old.
There’s nothing more important to people than staying young.
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PART B: Which detail from the text best supports the answer to Part A? 6.1
"‘For my days are as many as smiles.’” (Line 4)
“‘How much will you pay for an extra day?’” (Line 5)
“He asked when the time came to die.” (Line 10)
“All of the pearls in all of the seas” (Line 11)
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How does the illustration help the reader develop an understanding of the topic? 6.7
By contrasting how people have more possessions as they get older.
By showing that the Clock Man is trying to convince the child to buy more time.
By providing an example of how time can be a burden in life as one gets older.
By giving a description of the different things the child could use to pay for more time.
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Using the topic of “How Age Affects Time,” create 3 key points with 1 detail for each to organize this information using a boxes and bullets essay structure.

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