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Migration / Immigration / Refugees
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by Jeremy Levin
| 46 Questions
1
1 pt
Enter your first name:
2
1 pt
Enter your last name:
3
1 pt
Enter your Skema Student ID:
Watch the video
4
1 pt
What's your reaction to this video? What do you think is the purpose of the video?

5
1 pt
Imagine that your town is being bombed and attacked. You only have 10 minutes to evacuate. You need to prepare a bag. What will you take with you? Think of both practical things you will need to survive as well as sentimental things which are priceless and non-replaceable. What would you put in your bag?
Watch the video above by The Economist and answer the questions below.
6
1 pt
People have always migrated.
True
False
7
1 pt
All of the following are reasons for migration EXCEPT
famine
economic recession
wars
climate change
8
1 pt
Based on the video, what is the number of displaced people worldwide?
9
1 pt
How many of those displaced people are refugees?
10
1 pt
How many displaced Syrian refugees are there?
11
1 pt
Since the mid 2000s, as the European Union ___________, several million people have migrated from Eastern Europe to Britain and other EU Countries.
12
1 pt
Each year, thousands of migrants from Sub-Saharan Africa get on boats off the coast of ______ to try and find work in Europe.
13
1 pt
This sense of unprecedented scale has caused a ________.
14
1 pt
Anti-immigrant sentiment is on the _______.
15
1 pt
Donald Trump:
Open __________, it’s a sieve. We have no idea who’s coming in.
16
1 pt
In Germany, the right ________, Alternative für Deutschland has become the biggest opposition party in parliament.
17
1 pt
Migrants usually make a country richer.
True
False
18
1 pt
Migrants from the EU aren't very likely to pay taxes.
True
False
19
1 pt
With rich world countries __________________ demographically, they will also reap the benefits down the line.
20
1 pt
According to the video, our current way of socially integrating migrants is smart.
True
False
21
1 pt
The video suggests making efforts to make immigrants _______________ in society, not just long-term visitors.
22
1 pt
There is no quick and easy solution to migration, but without making a liberal case for it, this will _____________ societies for decades to come.
23
1 pt
In addition to what was mentioned in the video, can you think of any other solutions which would help the migrant / refugee crisis?

24
1 pt
Depending on the terms of the Brexit deal with the EU, some people say that Dover will become the new Calais and host a refugee "jungle". Do you agree or disagree? Why?

Read the following article and then answer the questions below.
Not nearly enough is being done for the Rohingyas fleeing Myanmar

To understand how grim things are for Myanmar’s Ro- yas, consider what passes for good news amid the Burmese
army’s two-month program in northern Rakhine state, where most of them live. The flood of refugees to
neighbouring Bangladesh must soon dwindle, charity workers say, because the Burmese army is running out of
Rohingya villages to burn. For the moment, however, terrified Rohingyas continue to pour across the border. In the
week to October 14th some 18,000 arrived. In less than two months a total of at least 582,000 of them have taken
refuge in Bangladesh. That makes the current crisis one of the most rapid international movements of people in
modern history, eclipsing in its intensity, for example, Syrians’ flight from civil war over the past six years.

Bangladesh has permitted the hungry, exhausted and traumatised Rohingyas to enter, and has set aside land for
vast refugee camps. But aid agencies, by their own admission, are swamped. A third of the refugees are not
receiving a full ration of food; fewer than half of the 130,000-odd small children and pregnant or nursing mothers
are getting enough to eat. The un- sanitary conditions in the camps, many of which are not accessible by road, make
outbreaks of disease likely. Health workers are rushing to vaccinate all the new arrivals against cholera. They are
only halfway there. Longer-term needs are barely being met at all. Fewer than one school-age refugee in ten, for
instance, is receiving any type of schooling. Those overseeing the relief effort reckon 2,300 classrooms are needed;
20 were erected in the past week.

The government of Myanmar has said that the Rohingyas will be allowed to return home and has promised to help
them rebuild. But that is a meaningless pledge when the army is still burning their villages. Admittedly, Aung San
Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s leader and a past winner of the Nobel peace prize, does not have the authority to rein in the
army, which is a law unto itself. But she has failed even to criticise its blatant ethnic cleansing. Even if the army
were under civilian control, her government’s attitude does not inspire confidence. A few days ago the minister
charged with bringing the Rohingyas back suggested that they had ethnically cleansed themselves, to make the
government look bad.

And even supposing that the government is sincere in its offer to bring the Rohingyas home, and that the army
allows it to do so, the process will clearly take some time. Bangladesh and Myanmar are already arguing about
whether the UN should be involved. After a bout of violence sent hundreds of thou- sands of Rohingyas to
Bangladesh in 1991-92, it took five years to repatriate even a portion of those who wished to return.
Myanmar’s shame

All this suggests that there will be huge numbers of Rohingyas in Bangladesh for a long time to come. Outsiders
should exert whatever pressure they can on the Burmese army and government to stop the atrocities and allow
the Rohingyas home. So far, the rebukes have been absurdly mild. This week, for example, the EU ruled out future
visits to Europe by senior Burmese officers, and delayed a trade mission.

Meanwhile, a concerted effort to make the refugees’ lives more bearable will also be needed. Donors should
funnel more money and aid workers to the camps. The government of Bangladesh should give Rohingyas more
freedom to make a better life for themselves in exile. They should be allowed to take formal work, for example,
and to study at local schools and universities. It would be heaping one injustice on another to ignore the refugees’
long-term needs in the almost certainly forlorn hope that they will soon be back where they belong.
The Economist / Oct 21st 2017
Find translations or synonyms for the following words which have been taken from the article above. These words are listed in chronological order.
25
1 pt
synonym for "among" (parmi)
26
1 pt
inonder
27
1 pt
decrease
28
1 pt
se précipiter
29
1 pt
faim
30
1 pt
submergé
31
1 pt
environ / à peu près
32
1 pt
épidémies
33
1 pt
à peine
34
1 pt
superviser / surveiller
35
1 pt
soulagement
36
1 pt
imaginer que / estimer
37
1 pt
promise (engagement)
38
1 pt
control (maitriser) - __________ in
39
1 pt
combat
40
1 pt
let / permettre
41
1 pt
reproches
42
1 pt
doux
43
1 pt
eliminate / exlude (put two words) _________ ______
44
1 pt
supportable
45
1 pt
faire passer / verser dans qlqch à l'aide d'un entennoir
46
1 pt
faible espoire / mince espoire (put two words)
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